#bya01, Rory's Story Cubes, and Narrative Writing

I’m an educator who teaches readers and writers who have been labeled struggling or at risk. I read more young adult fiction and non-fiction than I do adult fiction and non-fiction. This used to be because I was reading for my students. Now it’s less that and more because I’ll read what I like when I like and won’t apologize for it.

So I was excited to hear that Book Riot was starting a YA Quarterly Box and had to get in on that action.

I'm totally digging the YA Quarterly Box from @bookriot.

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Coming from the teacher place, the piece I’m most excited about is the story cubes. A few weeks ago we finished the first round of PARCC testing, and one of the sections my students really struggled with was the narrative writing task. We spend so much time teaching students how to read and write literary analysis and expository pieces that we didn’t allocate much time for creative writing.

This may come from our previous experiences with testing, wherein the writing task was neither valued nor narrative. Not to mention that sometimes facilitating creative thinking/writing is like pulling teeth.

It’s not an excuse. And as a teacher, encouraging creativity is one of the things I want to do better.

Previously, I’ve used writing prompts and photo prompts to get the creative juices going. RAFTs prompts help. So do creative reader response projects. Really, I’m just excited to have another tool to pull out of my writing teacher’s toolbox.

Story Cubes might be my new favorite thing.

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For this last grading period, I’m thinking it might make a good quick write activity. Maybe integrate it with the tl;dl bookcast we’re trying to start. In the future, I could totally see pairing up with some of the fifth graders my mother works with to share stories. Which would be awesome.

Thoughts on other ways to use Story Cubes?

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