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Death Note, Vol. 2: Confluence
Ready Player One
Death Note, Vol. 1: Boredom
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How to Eat Fried Worms
The Stranded
The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir
Casting Off
The Marbury Lens
Proper Gauge
Changers Book One: Drew
The Pigeon Wants a Puppy!
The Pigeon Needs a Bath!
The Martian
Loki: Agent of Asgard #3
Wise Young Fool
The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There
Judging a Book by Its Lover: A Field Guide to the Hearts and Minds of Readers Everywhere
The Darkest Minds


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On Read-Alouds

I’m not sure I have a blog roll on my blog anymore, especially since the blogs I follow all run through my Google Reader, but I read this post on The Reading Zone, and had to share.

One of the strategies I started using this year to get my students interested in stories is the read-aloud. I had a novel that I read aloud to the class when we’d have extra time at the end of the period. The only one we got to this year was Dreadlocks by Neal Shusterman, but I already have a list lined up for the fall, including Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Sharon G. Flake‘s The Skin I’m In, and Richard Wright‘s Rite of Passage. I might pull in some more Shusterman, but I haven’t decided yet. Hopefully, the book talks I’m planning to put into my weekly podcast will help me and the students decide what I should read to them–what will get them interested in reading the most.

My favorite book off of her list has to be The Giver by Lois Lowry. I recently finished the third in the series, called Messenger. Fantastic. I should have blogged about it, but I think it’s one of the novels I read recently that has yet to make it up here.

One aspect of TheReadingZone’s post that I particularly liked was her students’ comments on their novels. She mentions that she has students read a variety of genres, authors, etc. so at least something resonates with each of her students. What I like even more was that she has them register an opinion. I want to take a page out of her book.

The List of novels (and only the novels) I’m considering for my 8th graders (they’ll get to choose)

I think there might be more on that list, but I can’t remember off the top of my head.

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